Skip to main content

Showing results 1-10 of 48 for Understanding Disabilities

Search Results:

  • policy brief

    J. Karger, 2004

    The meaning of the term “reading disability resulting from organic dysfunction” used by the Library of Congress’s (LOC’s)National Library Service regulations is discussed. This is one of the four disability categories that determine …

  • Learn how to make your educational materials more understandable and predictable by using plain language and following conventions that will improve the learing experience for everyone.

  • Photo of a help button on a keyboard

    Accessible educational materials, or AEM, are materials and technologies usable for learning across the widest range of individual variability, regardless of format or features. Whether a material or technology is designed from the start to be accessible for all learners or is made accessible for learners with disabilities, it is considered AEM.

  • Photo of a laptop with computer code on-screen

    Resources for publishers and software developers on best practices to ensure accessibility of educational materials.

  • Photo of people's legs standing at a counter

    Accessible educational materials and technologies are essential for learning by students with a range of disabilities. At the same time, materials and technologies designed to be accessible for people with disabilities include options that increase flexibility and make them more usable for everyone.

  • presentation

    4:00PM – 4:30PM ET on Wednesday, October 10, 2018

    This session will explore two key questions: What does accessibility mean? How can OERs and accessibility come together to support learning for all students? The AEM Center will share a number of practical tips for quickly improving the accessibility of openly licensed content through the implementation of the POUR principles for accessible design. With POUR, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines are distilled into four core principles: content needs to be Perceivable with more than one sense, it needs to be Operable with more than one input method, it needs to behave in a clear, consistent and predictable way in order to be Understandable, and it needs to be Robust so that it works well with both current and future platforms and technologies including the assistive technologies many learners with disabilities use to access information

  • webinar

    2:00PM – 3:00PM ET on Tuesday, May 15, 2018

    When you deliver a presentation at a conference or at a meeting, you want everyone in attendance to understand your message. However, many presenters unintentionally erect barriers that make that goal difficult for some attendees. In this webinar, you will learn about best practices for making your presentations accessible to a wider audience that includes not only people with disabilities, but also people who call into a presentation and do not have access to the visuals, and those sitting in the back row of a large room. You will learn techniques for making your slides more accessible using a number of popular presentation tools such as Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple’s Keynote and Google Slides, as well as how to design an accessible handout that provides value even after the presentation is over. Finally, you will learn how to deliver your presentation in a way that allows everyone to participate and engage

  • webinar
    Crowded room of participants facing a screen and a presenter

    2:00PM – 3:00PM ET on Tuesday, August 21, 2018

    When you deliver a presentation at a conference or at a meeting, you want everyone in attendance to understand your message. However, many presenters unintentionally erect barriers that make that goal difficult for some attendees. In this webinar, you will learn about best practices for making your presentations accessible to a wider audience that includes not only people with disabilities, but also people who call into a presentation and do not have access to the visuals, and those sitting in the back row of a large room. You will learn techniques for making your slides more accessible using a number of popular presentation tools such as Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple’s Keynote and Google Slides, as well as how to design an accessible handout that provides value even after the presentation is over. Finally, you will learn how to deliver your presentation in a way that allows everyone to participate and engage.

  • webinar
    Close-up of laptop and headphones.

    1:00PM – 2:00PM ET on Friday, August 17, 2018

    As states develop and revise policies that guide the accessibility of educational materials procured for all learners, including students with disabilities, a common and accurate understanding of the term “accessible” is essential. Regardless of format (print, video, audio, web, simulation, etc.) or source (commercial or open), the meaning and purpose of accessibility is a relevant, legal, and ethical consideration. This webinar will begin to address commonly asked questions. Join us as we kick off a continuing discussion

  • In this Quick Start you will find answers to questions that often arise for postsecondary faculty about AEM as well as links to additional AEM Center resources.

  • Page 1 (current)
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5