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Showing results 1-10 of 57 for Understanding Disabilities

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  • policy brief

    J. Karger, 2004

    The meaning of the term “reading disability resulting from organic dysfunction” used by the Library of Congress’s (LOC’s)National Library Service regulations is discussed. This is one of the four disability categories that determine …

  • Learn how to make your educational materials more understandable and predictable by using plain language and following conventions that will improve the learing experience for everyone.

  • Photo of a child with a hearing aid reading a book

    Accessible educational materials, or AEM, are materials and technologies usable for learning across the widest range of individual variability, regardless of format or features. Whether a material or technology is designed from the start to be accessible for all learners or is made accessible for learners with disabilities, it is considered AEM.

  • Photo of a laptop with computer code on-screen

    Resources for publishers and software developers on best practices to ensure accessibility of educational materials.

  • webinar
    Graphic of university students and various educational supplies.

    1:00PM – 2:00PM ET on Tuesday, April 14, 2020

    Using the syllabus as our template, we'll begin to explore how to put the components of universal design and the four core principles (Perceivable, Operable, Understandable and Robust, or POUR) into practice. Brought to you by the NSF funded ATE Central project and the National AEM Center at CAST, we'll explore how you can shape your class syllabus to provide a welcoming environment for all students, including those with disabilities. There will be time to get answers to your accessibility questions, and examples of how others in the community college sector are putting Universal Design for Learning into practice in their classrooms and labs.

  • Photo of people's legs standing at a counter

    Accessible educational materials and technologies are essential for learning by students with a range of disabilities. At the same time, materials and technologies designed to be accessible for people with disabilities include options that increase flexibility and make them more usable for everyone.

  • PALM logo

    Five guidelines educators can follow to buy accessible and advance a market model for AEM, pushing us closer to a time when buying accessible requires nothing more than just buying.

  • Photo of fingers on a keyboard

    The Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act (MTIA) updated section 121 of the U.S. Copyright Law (also known as the “Chafee Amendment”) to meet the terms of the treaty. The goal of both the treaty and the MTIA is to ensure equitable access to books and other text-based materials by individuals with visual or other print disabilities. This page explains how OSEP has clarified the NIMAS language as a result of the implementation of the MTIA.

  • webinar
    Shuttertock graphic by Makc of two hands operating a tablet which is displaying text

    2:00PM – 3:00PM ET on Tuesday, June 11, 2019

    A Voluntary Product Accessibility Template (VPAT) is meant to provide a standard format for vendors to report the extent to which a digital material or technology product meets accessibility standards. Despite recent updates meant to streamline the VPAT and make it easier to use, the VPAT remains a highly technical document. In this webinar, we will discuss the benefits and limitations of the VPAT and then walk you through an exemplar VPAT as we provide tips for what to look for in each section when interpreting a VPAT from a vendor.

  • webinar

    3:00PM – 4:00PM ET on Monday, April 6, 2020

    Learn skills for creating high-quality videos that also engage learners and promote understanding.

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