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Showing results 1-10 of 59 for Understanding Disabilities

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  • policy brief

    J. Karger, 2004

    The meaning of the term “reading disability resulting from organic dysfunction” used by the Library of Congress’s (LOC’s)National Library Service regulations is discussed. This is one of the four disability categories that determine …

  • Learn how to make your educational materials more understandable and predictable by using plain language and following conventions that will improve the learing experience for everyone.

  • Photo of a child with a hearing aid reading a book

    Accessible educational materials, or AEM, are materials and technologies usable for learning across the widest range of individual variability, regardless of format or features. Whether a material or technology is designed from the start to be accessible for all learners or is made accessible for learners with disabilities, it is considered AEM.

  • Photo of a laptop with computer code on-screen

    Resources for publishers and software developers on best practices to ensure accessibility of educational materials.

  • Photo of people's legs standing at a counter

    Accessible educational materials and technologies are essential for learning by students with a range of disabilities. At the same time, materials and technologies designed to be accessible for people with disabilities include options that increase flexibility and make them more usable for everyone.

  • webinar
    Shuttertock graphic by Makc of two hands operating a tablet which is displaying text

    2:00PM – 3:00PM ET on Tuesday, June 11, 2019

    A Voluntary Product Accessibility Template (VPAT) is meant to provide a standard format for vendors to report the extent to which a digital material or technology product meets accessibility standards. Despite recent updates meant to streamline the VPAT and make it easier to use, the VPAT remains a highly technical document. In this webinar, we will discuss the benefits and limitations of the VPAT and then walk you through an exemplar VPAT as we provide tips for what to look for in each section when interpreting a VPAT from a vendor.

  • Photo of fingers on a keyboard

    The Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act (MTIA) updated section 121 of the U.S. Copyright Law (also known as the “Chafee Amendment”) to meet the terms of the treaty. The goal of both the treaty and the MTIA is to ensure equitable access to books and other text-based materials by individuals with visual or other print disabilities. This page explains how OSEP has clarified the NIMAS language as a result of the implementation of the MTIA.

  • presentation

    4:00PM – 4:30PM ET on Wednesday, October 10, 2018

    This session will explore two key questions: What does accessibility mean? How can OERs and accessibility come together to support learning for all students? The AEM Center will share a number of practical tips for quickly improving the accessibility of openly licensed content through the implementation of the POUR principles for accessible design. With POUR, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines are distilled into four core principles: content needs to be Perceivable with more than one sense, it needs to be Operable with more than one input method, it needs to behave in a clear, consistent and predictable way in order to be Understandable, and it needs to be Robust so that it works well with both current and future platforms and technologies including the assistive technologies many learners with disabilities use to access information

  • presentation

    2:00PM – 4:45PM ET on Friday, November 8, 2019

    Accessibility of an OER means that all students are afforded the same opportunity to learn from a material, regardless of the tools they use for access. Learner variability is the norm, not the exception, so consideration of the ways students interact with digital materials is essential for curating and authoring inclusive OER.

  • statement
    image of computer keyboard

    CAST, 2013

    CAST responds to the U.S. Department of Education Guidance on Title I Peer Review Process

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