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Foundations in Audio-Supported Reading for Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired with An Annotated Bibliography

article
Author(s)

Richard Jackson & Valerie Hendricks

Publisher

National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (AEM Center)

Description

Currently, students with vision challenges are learning to read through the medium of either large print or braille, following or coinciding with a Learning Media Assessment (LMA). They are also learning to use universally designed or assistive technologies, which may or may not be infused with their school’s technology curriculum. They may or may not be receiving explicit instruction in listening. Moving forward it would be most advantageous to develop a curriculum that would combine basic literacy instruction in either braille or print with explicit instruction in aural language comprehension using technologies widely available in many schools today. Inclusive schools where multi-tiered systems of instructional support are in place would provide a fertile environment for creating a curriculum for effectively blending literacy, aural language, and technology. In order to advance such an agenda for curriculum design, several knowledge areas are suggested within which foundational sources are cited and annotated.

For more information, see our Audio-Supported Reading page.

Technology

Equipment or system where principal function is creation, conversion, duplication, control, display, interchange, transmission, reception, or broadcast of data.

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Cite As

Jackson, R. & Hendricks, V. (2014). Foundations in Audio-Supported Reading for Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired with An Annotated Bibliography. Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum. Retrieved [insert date] from http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2014/foundations-audio-supported-reading-blind-visually-impaired-annotated-bibliography.html